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  Chlamydia Gonorrhoea Syphilis Genital Warts Genital Herpes HIV Hepatitis B Scabies Pubic Lice
How do you get it? Unprotected sex with a person who has got the infection. It can be passed on through vaginal, anal or oral sex. Unprotected sex with a person who has got the infection. It can be passed on through vaginal, anal or oral sex. Unprotected sex with a person who has got the infection. It can be passed on through vaginal, anal or oral sex or from a mother to her unborn baby. Skin to skin contact with genital warts.  Genital warts are caused by some types of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Contact with the herpes sore, through intimate sexual contact or through skin to skin contact. HIV is passed on through sexual fluid, blood and can be passed on from a mother to her unborn baby and through breast milk. Passed on through blood and body fluids so can be passed on through unprotected sex with an infected person or from a mother to her unborn baby. Passed on through close physical contact with an infected person. Spread through close physical contact.
Symptoms Many people don't get any symptoms.  Some people can have a discharge that is unusual, pain when passing urine, pain in the lower abdomen or testicles, bleeding after sex. Some people may not have symptoms but often there is a discharge that can be thick and may smell.

There are 3 stages to the infection:

 

Painless sore on the genitals or mouth that lasts 2-6 weeks.

 

Skin rash particularly visible on the palms of the hand and soles of the feet and the torso (upper body)

 

Serious damage can be caused to the internal organs.

Small lumps that develop into warts on or around the genital area.

 

Some strains of the virus can cause cervical cancer.

Painful blisters on the genitals and surrounding areas. HIV has no specific symptoms but your immune system weakens month to years after first getting the infection leaving you more susceptible to all types of infection and some cancers.

Hepatitis B affects the liver and can cause feeling sick,

being sick,

lack of appetite,

flu-like symptoms, such as tiredness, general aches and pains, and headache, yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice).

Intense itching and skin rash caused by tiny mites which burrow into the skin. Itching caused by the lice living in pubic hair and feeding on tiny amounts of blood.
What is the test for it? A urine test or vaginal swab can be carried out.    A urine test or vaginal swab can be carried out.   Swabs can also be taken from the mouth and anus. A blood test will be used to diagnose Syphilis. Visual examination of an outbreak. Visual examination and swabs of the sores to confirm the diagnosis. A blood test will be used to diagnose HIV. A blood test will be used to diagnose Hepatitis B. Visual examination. Visual examination.
How is it treated? Antibiotics are used to treat the infection. Antibiotics are used to treat the infection. Antibiotics are used to treat it but they are given by injection. The treatment will depend on the size of warts but can include creams or lotions, freezing the warts and in extreme cases, surgery may be necessary. The treatment will help with the symptoms but can't get rid of the virus – that stays in your system forever. Treated with antiviral medication and sometimes a cream is given to help reduce the pain. The treatment will help with the symptoms but can't get rid of the virus – that stays in your system forever.  HIV is managed by various drugs called anti-retroviral drugs.  The level of the virus in the blood is regularly monitored and treatment may be adjusted accordingly. The treatment will help with the symptoms and the level of virus in your system but can't get rid of the virus – that stays in your system forever. Depending on how long someone has had the infection, drugs can be given to help the symptoms but the virus cannot be cured by treatment – many people fight off the virus naturally within a few months. The treatment is a cream that is put on all over the body which will kill the mites. Treated with a lotion that will kill the lice and the eggs.
What can happen if it's not treated? If Chlamydia is left untreated, it can lead to infertility in men and women, joint pain, pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic genital pain in men and women and an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy (where the foetus starts to develop in the fallopian tube). Women can get pelvic inflammatory disease and may have complications during pregnancy and labour and the infection can be passed to the baby.  Men may get testicular pain and the infection spread to the testicles and prostate gland.  Fertility can be reduced in both men and women. Syphilis can lead to serious complication and even death. Warts may eventually disappear, continue to grow or may increase in number. Untreated herpes in unlikely to cause complications but outbreaks can be more frequent and severe. Untreated HIV will lead to problems with the immune system which may lead to various complications and illnesses. Hepatitis can cause liver damage if it becomes chronic (long standing). The mites will continue to cause severe itching. Lice will continue to feed and reproduce.
How can it be prevented? Consistent use of condoms. Consistent use of condoms. Condoms can minimise the risk but prevention also includes avoiding sex or only having sex with one person who has not got the infection.

The only way to prevent getting the virus is to avoid sex or only have sex with someone you know does not have the virus.

There is a vaccine for HPV which protects against the strains of the virus that are linked to cervical cancer.

The only way to prevent getting the virus is to avoid sex or only have sex with someone you know does not have the virus. Consistent use of condoms, understanding how HIV is transmitted and knowing your partner. There is a vaccination for hepatitis B for people who are at risk.  It is also advisable to use condoms consistently. Avoid physical contact with anyone infected.  Do not share towels or clothing. All towels, bedding, clothing etc. needs to be washed at 50 degrees or higher. Avoid close physical contact with anyone infected.

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